Teacher allegedly locks child in closet, investigation underway

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A teacher in the Jackson County Central School District in Minnesota is under investigation after video footage emerged online allegedly showing a middle school child locked in a classroom closet.

In the video, closet doors can be seen secured shut with two chairs. A girl walks up to the closet and knocks to see if the child inside is okay, when a voice off-camera, said to be that of the teacher, can be heard saying “No, no, no, no. Uh-huh.” “I’m not even doing anything,” the girl replied.

According to the Jackson County Pilot, the incident occurred in September, but the school district has only recently been made aware of it after the footage was shared widely on social media.

Another child’s voice can be heard saying, “he’s stuck in the closet,” followed by knocking from within the closet and a child saying, “Can I have help?” Other children are heard laughing.

In a statement on the school district’s Facebook page, superintendent Barry Schmidt informs parents that the district was aware of the video showing the alleged incident.

“[T]he District is prevented by state and federal privacy laws from discussing the specific details of the incident, or the individuals who may have been involved,” Schmidt explained to parents. “However, we can assure you that immediately upon learning of this incident, the District opened an investigation and placed the individual who was involved in the matter on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation.  We continue to work through that investigation, and hope to have the matter concluded soon.”

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