UK's National Health Service drops 'woman' from guidance on ovarian cancer to be 'inclusive'

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The UK’s National Health Services (NHS) has scrubbed the word “women” from many of their guidances in order to be “inclusive.” The UK government-funded healthcare and medical agency is the one-stop shop for UK citizens to access their universal health care benefits.

The NHS’s erasure of “women” is from their resources on ovarian, cervical, and womb cancers, all of which only impact women. The NHS overview guidance for ovarian cancer previously read, “Ovarian cancer, or cancer of the ovaries, is one of the most common types of cancer in women. The ovaries are a pair of small organs located low in the tummy that are connected to the womb and store a woman’s supply of eggs. Ovarian cancer mainly affects women who have been through the menopause (usually over the age of 50), but it can sometimes affect younger women.”

The updated overview guidance for ovarian cancer now reads, “Ovarian cancer affects the 2 small organs (ovaries) that store the eggs needed to make babies. Anyone with ovaries can get ovarian cancer, but it mostly affects those over 50.”

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